NerdyHearn
Home
Blog

Contact
Mailing List

Software

Active Directory Products
Object Compare
Permission Compare

IPhone Products
Calls To Calendar
SMS To CSV
SMS To Gmail
Voicemail To Gmail

Sites
DocuTerminal
How Long For Me
My Music To Me
SaveMySerials
TypeCount

Blog
Twitter

NerdyHearn - Blog


<< Back To All Blogs

Hello World in Adobe AIR

Thursday, January 29th, 2009

I started playing with Adobe AIR tonight, with the intention of familiarizing myself with another technology as I have seen it becoming more and more popular. I must say that I am very impressed with the ability to "bring the web to the desktop" using simple HTML and Javascript. I figured I would run through my simple Hello World application that I wrote in AIR, and walk through running your first application.

To run through this quick tutorial, you will need the following installed:
Adobe AIR Runtime
Adobe AIR SDK properly setup in your Environment settings Path (for Windows)
A notepad application to edit the files

The Adobe AIR Runtime and SDK can be downloaded from Adobe's website. For further information on their installation and configuration please refer to their documentation as it is documented very well.

The Adobe AIR program structure has a very simple layout:

An XML file for your application configuration (for you Java gurus think of this as your Manifest). My very basic file for this, which is pretty self-explanatory was as follows:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<application xmlns="http://ns.adobe.com/air/application/1.0">
<id>com.nerdyhearn.helloworld</id>
<filename>HelloWorld</filename>
<name>HelloWorld</name>
<description>My description here</description>
<version>1.0</version>

<initialWindow>
<content>index.html</content>
<title>Whats up world?</title>
<systemChrome>standard</systemChrome>
<transparent>false</transparent>
<visible>true</visible>
<minimizable>true</minimizable>
<maximizable>true</maximizable>
<resizable>true</resizable>
</initialWindow>
</application>

The only real important aspect of this file is that the initialWindow element actually refers to an html file that you must have provided with the application.

Then in your HTML file, just simply code in HTML (VALID! HTML) as you normally would for a standard web page with CSS, Javascript, and XHTML.

My example page (which I saved as index.html) was as follows:
<html>
<head>
<title>Yo whats up</title>
</head>
<body>
I got here!
</body>
</html>

When you have these two files set and ready to roll, simple go to your command line, and run the following command:

adl com.nerdyhearn.helloworld.xml

You should then see your application!

I haven't made it any further then that yet, but once I get into some more in-depth topics I'll keep ya'll updated!

AIRin' Tom Out.

Tags

Adobe_Air

Related Blogs

Comments

Currently no comments.

Add A Comment

Name:


URL:


Email Address: (not public, used to send notifications on further comments)


Comments:



Enter the text above, except for the 1st and last character:


NerdyHearn - Latest tech news relating to C#, ASP.NET, SharePoint, PHP, general development, and more. DocuTerminal - Online Filing Cabinet solution. Scan, search and archive your paper documents. SaveMySerials - Protect yourself from theft, fire, natural disasters and more by recording your serial numbers My Music To Me - Stream your subsonic music collection to your Sonos wireless system TypeCount - Count how often you type across different computers! ServrTrackr - Monitor your SSL certificates, website uptime, and DNS configurations